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  • Families gather outside of Harrisburg Elementary School on a spring evening after the school’s bike rodeo. While many small Midwest towns are fading away, Harrisburg remains active. Many residents attribute this fact to the strong schools located near the middle of town.

  • Highway 124 sits empty on a Sunday morning in downtown Harrisburg. The highway runs through the middle of town and connects Harrisburg with small farms and larger towns like Columbia and Fayette.

  • Mike Wilcox and his daughter pick up some fuel at C&K Service Center on his way home after work. The shop has been operating in the middle of Harrisburg since the 1940’s and still has the “Ken’s” sign out front decades after Ken sold the business.

  • Kerry Pudenz changes a tire at C&K Service Center. With a transmission shop, gas pumps, and general repair, C&K is one of the busiest businesses in Harrisburg. People also drop in regularly whether or not they have a vehicle being worked on.

  • Photos from Harrisburg’s past line the walls of Lonnie Ray’s BBQ. The only restaurant in town has become a destination for barbeque fans from around the state and is the closest thing to a tourist attraction in town.

  • Clint Freeman touches up a deer mount in the taxidermy shop behind his house. Over the last decade, Freeman has converted a passion for the outdoors and wildlife into a part-time job as a taxidermist. Much of the open land around Harrisburg is managed for wildlife and hunting.

  • Assistants wrap the ankles of a “cutting horse” at Greg Beutenmiller’s stables down the road from Harrisburg High School. A cutting horse is used for picking and herding cattle in competitions and shows. The Beutenmillers raise and show cutting horses around the world.

  • Residents of Harrisburg and surrounding towns peruse through a community-wide yard sale at Julie Krause’s home on a Saturday morning. While the front yard was full of toys for sale, the back yard was filled with toys still in use by Krause’s kids and other children from Harrisburg that she watches during the day.

  • Sarah Beutenmiller rests on her horse while watching others warm-up their horses in the arena behind her house. Horses are a common sight around Harrisburg both as pets and for business.

  • Kerry Pudenz, left, reaches around Chris Pudenz, his wife, to fill out an invoice while she sorts receipts from a delivery of parts from Columbia. Chris began working at C&K after retiring as an elementary school teacher in Columbia.

  • Scraps and artifacts from the last two centuries of life in Harrisburg line the fence of the “Hazard House.” Named for the past owners, Terry McBride has been renovating the 170-year-old home on the south side of town. During the process, he has been decorating the yard with scraps found around the previously abandoned house and property.